Film Baloney
Interviewer: Give Me the argument, the best argument you know, for the power of cinema.
Quentin Tarantino: Oh gosh, you know one of the things about cinema that I just find very moving, it’s why it’s my favorite art form, is when you go to a movie and you see a certain sequence, and if there is real cinematic power and there’s cinematic flare. There are certain filmakers that you feel were touched by God to make movies and it would be a combination of editing and sound, usually it’s like visual images connected with music or something, but when those things work and they really connect..it’s just like you forget to breathe. You are really transported to a different place. Music doesn’t quite do that on it’s own, novels don’t quite do it, & a painting doesn’t quite do it. They do it there way but with cinema, especially if you’re in a theatre and you’re sharing the experience with a bunch of other people so it’s this mass thing going on..it’s just truly, truly thrilling.(x)

Interviewer: Give Me the argument, the best argument you know, for the power of cinema.

Quentin Tarantino: Oh gosh, you know one of the things about cinema that I just find very moving, it’s why it’s my favorite art form, is when you go to a movie and you see a certain sequence, and if there is real cinematic power and there’s cinematic flare. There are certain filmakers that you feel were touched by God to make movies and it would be a combination of editing and sound, usually it’s like visual images connected with music or something, but when those things work and they really connect..it’s just like you forget to breathe. You are really transported to a different place. Music doesn’t quite do that on it’s own, novels don’t quite do it, & a painting doesn’t quite do it. They do it there way but with cinema, especially if you’re in a theatre and you’re sharing the experience with a bunch of other people so it’s this mass thing going on..it’s just truly, truly thrilling.(x)

My 3DS and OoT3D arrived today

Goodbye money hello joy

What are your favorite Studio Ghibli films?
Anonymous

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH. Okay this is a really hard question because I love them all!
Spirited Away, Princess Mononoke, Howl’s Moving Castle, Kiki’s Delivery Service. I love Spirited Away because it’s the first one I saw and all of the spirits in the bath house are amazing. Princess Mononoke and Howl’s Moving Castle are tragic but still fantastical in the typical Ghibli style. I love Kiki’s Delivery Service because I want to be Kiki. I’d say the first three have more obviously strong plots but these are all my favourites and then My Neighbour Totoro and Porco Rosso come close afterwards.


I hate the way you talk to me, and the way you cut your hair. I hate the way you drive my car, I hate it when you stare. I hate your big dumb combat boots and the way you read my mind. I hate you so much it makes me sick, it even makes me rhyme. I hate the way you’re always right, I hate it when you lie. I hate it when you make me laugh, even worse when you make me cry. I hate it when you’re not around, and the fact that you didn’t call. But mostly I hate the way I don’t hate you, not even close… not even a little bit… not even at all.

I hate the way you talk to me, and the way you cut your hair. I hate the way you drive my car, I hate it when you stare. I hate your big dumb combat boots and the way you read my mind. I hate you so much it makes me sick, it even makes me rhyme. I hate the way you’re always right, I hate it when you lie. I hate it when you make me laugh, even worse when you make me cry. I hate it when you’re not around, and the fact that you didn’t call. But mostly I hate the way I don’t hate you, not even close… not even a little bit… not even at all.

Beetlejuice (1988)

Beetlejuice (1988)

Go and get a job. Go and find a flat. Find somebody else. Put them in the flat. Make them stay. Get a toaster. Go to work. Get on the bus. Look at your boss. Say, “fuck”. Sit down. Pick up the thing. Go blank. Scream internally. Go home. Listen to the radio. Look at the other person. Think, “WHY? Why did this happen?”. Go to bed. Lie awake! At night! Get up. Feel groggy. Put the things on - your clothes - whatever they’re called. Go out the door, into work - same thing! Same people, again. It’s real, it is happening to you. Go home again! Sit. Radio. Dinner - mmm. GARDENING, GARDENING, GARDENING. Death.
Dylan Moran
The Big Lebowski.

The Big Lebowski.

"Wave of Mutilation" from OMGposters

"Wave of Mutilation" from OMGposters

Behind the scenes of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.

Behind the scenes of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.

Tonight I watched Shutter Island (2010) for the first time *spoilers spoilers spoilers*. I loved it. Such a brilliant psychological twist.
In the last scene I’ve got to say, Leo DiCaprio performs so perfectly with subtlety that I felt it clear that he knew himself to be Andrew Laeddis, and had not relapsed. The way he is already looking - before they approach - towards the group of people with Cawley who are going to perform the lobotomy, then ignores “Chuck” when he calls Laeddis “Teddy”, how he walks calmly towards the orderlies while glancing at Cawley, and especially the line that he delivers to Chuck (“This place makes me wonder, which would be worse… to live as a monster, or to die as a good man?”).
It all indicates that the guilt had entirely overwhelmed his mind so he voluntarily went for it, although the film is supposed to be ambiguous in its ending. This is unlike the book, where the last line of the film is not included, and Laeddis evidently is unaware of the truth once again.
Anyway I think Shutter Island was great with suspense that builds up and unravels and the whole thing is correct to the time period of the 1950s in design as well as medical practices, regardless some people have been knocking it apparently for its predictability. Hallucinations from the beginning identify an underlying problem and yes, of course some scenes, such as when Laeddis enters the lighthouse are easy to figure out beforehand. But the whole film? Nah I don’t reckon so.

Tonight I watched Shutter Island (2010) for the first time *spoilers spoilers spoilers*. I loved it. Such a brilliant psychological twist.

In the last scene I’ve got to say, Leo DiCaprio performs so perfectly with subtlety that I felt it clear that he knew himself to be Andrew Laeddis, and had not relapsed. The way he is already looking - before they approach - towards the group of people with Cawley who are going to perform the lobotomy, then ignores “Chuck” when he calls Laeddis “Teddy”, how he walks calmly towards the orderlies while glancing at Cawley, and especially the line that he delivers to Chuck (“This place makes me wonder, which would be worse… to live as a monster, or to die as a good man?”).

It all indicates that the guilt had entirely overwhelmed his mind so he voluntarily went for it, although the film is supposed to be ambiguous in its ending. This is unlike the book, where the last line of the film is not included, and Laeddis evidently is unaware of the truth once again.

Anyway I think Shutter Island was great with suspense that builds up and unravels and the whole thing is correct to the time period of the 1950s in design as well as medical practices, regardless some people have been knocking it apparently for its predictability. Hallucinations from the beginning identify an underlying problem and yes, of course some scenes, such as when Laeddis enters the lighthouse are easy to figure out beforehand. But the whole film? Nah I don’t reckon so.